Trauma During Childhood May Increase Likelihood Of Adult Migraines, Study Shows

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A child who experiences a traumatic event may be more prone to migraines as an adult, a new study suggests. 

Published in Headache, the report concluded that adults who were exposed to childhood adversity have higher odds of experiencing migraine headaches in adulthood. Some of these traumatic events include witnessing parental domestic violence, or experiencing childhood physical and sexual abuse.

Researchers at the University of Toronto found that parental domestic violence in front of girls increase the likelihood of them suffering from migraines as adults (64%). For men, the chances are a little lower (52%). 

Investigators took a look at a nationally representative sample of 12,638 women and 10,358 men. They examined participants older than 18 years of age from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), a survey designed to gather health-related data.

“The most surprising finding was the link between exposure to parental domestic violence and migraines. Even after accounting for variables including age, race, socioeconomic status, history of depression and anxiety, and childhood physical and sexual abuse, men and women who had witnessed parental domestic violence had 52% and 64% higher odds of migraine, respectively, compared to those without such a history,” says co-author Esme Fuller-Thomson, PhD, in a prepared statement. 

“The cross-sectional design of our study does not allow us to determine if the association between early adversities and migraines is causative, but our findings do underline the importance of future prospective studies investigating the long-term physical health of children exposed to parental domestic violence,” she said. 

Primary-care providers can help identify intimate-partner violence
Researchers at the University of Toronto found that parental domestic violence in front of girls increase the likelihood of them suffering from migraines as adults (64%)

Experiencing a traumatic event during childhood may raise the risk for migraines as an adult, new Canadian research suggests.

"We found the more types of violence the individual had been exposed to during their childhood, the greater the odds of migraine," study author Sarah Brennenstuhl, from the University of Toronto, said in a university news release.

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