Can Music Help Doctors Develop Relationships With Patients?

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For one physician, writing songs has improved her self-awareness and strengthened her relationships with patients.
For one physician, writing songs has improved her self-awareness and strengthened her relationships with patients.

HealthDay News -- For one physician, writing songs has improved her self-awareness and strengthened her relationships with patients, according to an article published by the American Medical Association.

Cardiologist Suzie Brown, MD, from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., reported feeling emotionally exhausted at the end of her training, and she sought out music as a place to be honest about her feelings.

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According to the article, Brown now writes and performs songs with her husband, and works part-time as a heart failure and cardiac transplant specialist. The music has helped Brown to improve her self-awareness and her ability to connect emotionally with patients.

"The emotions she once suppressed in practice — the same ones that often lead so many talented physicians to depression, cynicism, and burnout — have now touched the hearts of thousands in her 2011 debut album Heartstrings, which has been featured at Starbucks, the Gap and Anthropologie," according to the article.

Reference

Music and medicine: How one cardiologist found peace in song. AMA Wire. http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/ama-wire/post/music-medicine-one-cardiologist-found-peace-song. Accessed November 25, 2015.

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