No Benefits Found in Adding Methylcobalamin to Pregabalin for Treating Postherpetic Neuralgia

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There was no significant difference in visual analog pain scores between pregabalin alone and pregabalin in combination with methylcobalamin.
There was no significant difference in visual analog pain scores between pregabalin alone and pregabalin in combination with methylcobalamin.

The following article is part of conference coverage from the IASP 2018 conference in Boston, Massachusetts. Clinical Pain Advisor's staff will be reporting breaking news associated with research conducted by leading experts in pain medicine. Check back for the latest news from IASP 2018.

Adding methylcobalamin to pregabalin therapy has no advantage for patients with postherpetic neuralgia, according to data to be presented by researchers from Ojas Hospital and Navodaya Medical College in India at the 2018 World Congress on Pain, held September 12-16, 2018, in Boston, Massachusetts.

This determination came after a 10-month randomized study of 90 individuals who have been diagnosed with postherpetic neuralgia, separated in to 2 groups. Individuals in group A received pregabalin 75 mg.  Individuals in group B were given a fixed dose combination of pregabalin 75 mg with the addition of methylcobalamin 750 mcg. Baseline pain intensity was measured on a 10-point visual analog scale; pain was assessed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after initiation of treatment.

The premedication average visual analog pain scale score for individuals in group A was 6.86. In group B, the premedication VAS score averaged 6.97. After medication, the average visual analog pain scale score decreased to 2.95 for participants in group A and to 3.11 in group B.

Researchers concluded that there was no significant difference in visual analog pain scores between using pregabalin alone and using pregabalin in combination with methylcobalamin. Rather than providing any advantages, adding methylcobalamin increases therapy costs. Of note, side effects, which included dizziness and somnolence, were statistically similar in both groups.

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Reference

Garg A, Jha A. A comparative study between pregabalin alone and pregabalin in combination with methylcobalamin for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Presented at: IASP World Congress; September 12-16, 2018; Boston, Massachusetts.

For more coverage of IASP 2018, click here.

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