Capsaicin 8% Patch Effective, Safe for Localized Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

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Study participants were given a capsaicin 8% patch to be applied to the upper and lower extremities for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia, postoperative cicatrized pain, or other localized perip
Study participants were given a capsaicin 8% patch to be applied to the upper and lower extremities for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia, postoperative cicatrized pain, or other localized perip

The following article is part of conference coverage from the IASP 2018 conference in Boston, Massachusetts. Clinical Pain Advisor's staff will be reporting breaking news associated with research conducted by leading experts in pain medicine. Check back for the latest news from IASP 2018.

Capsaicin 8% patch has demonstrated efficacy and safety in improving pain, allodynia, and hyperalgesia associated with a wide range of localized peripheral neuropathy types, according to a study to be presented at the 2018 World Congress on Pain, held September 12-16 in Boston, Massachusetts.

This multicenter observational study included 60 participants (60% women; mean age, 50.9 years) who were given a capsaicin 8% patch to be applied to the upper and lower extremities for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (n=8), postoperative cicatrized pain (n=24), or other localized peripheral neuropathic pain (n=26). The capsaicin patch was used in combination with regular analgesic treatments for localized peripheral neuropathic pain. Average continuous daily pain was assessed with a 0 to 10 visual analog scale.

Reductions were observed from baseline to the end of treatment in continuous daily pain (from 6.8 to 4.1, respectively), mechanical allodynia (from 7.9 to 4.2, respectively), and hyperalgesia (from 7.4 to 4.4, respectively). Physical functioning improved from baseline in 31 patients (49%), and 39 study participants (65%) reported experiencing analgesia after the initial application. The patch was re-administered after a mean of 87 days in this cohort.

The most reported adverse events related to treatment was mild pain at the application site, with 43 participants reporting erythema, 27 participants reporting a sensation of burning, and 13 participants experiencing pruritus. The majority of patients (80%) reported adequate to good satisfaction, the remaining reporting poor satisfaction with the patch.

The study researchers conclude that “Repeated treatment [with the capsaicin 8% patch] improved continuous pain relief, hyperalgesia and allodynia in a broad range of localized peripheral neuropathic pain etiologies. Capsaicin 8% patch was well tolerated…[and] is a suitable treatment option for localized peripheral neuropathic pain in monotherapy or combined with other analgesics.”

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Reference

Galvez R, Maldonado J, Vela A, et al. Repeated treatment with capsaicin 8% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain.Presented at the World Congress on Pain 2018; September 12-16, 2018; Boston, MA. Poster 64478.

For more coverage of IASP 2018, click here.

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