HealthDay News — There are few associations of recommended vaccines with serious key adverse events, according to a review published online May 25 in Vaccine.

Courtney Gidengil, M.D., from RAND Corporation in Boston and colleagues conducted a literature review to examine the safety of vaccines recommended for children, adults, and pregnant women in the United States. A total of 338 studies reported in 518 publications met the inclusion criteria.

The researchers found that the strength of evidence (SoE) was high for no increased risk for autism following measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine in children. SoE was also high for an elevated, but still low, risk for febrile seizures with MMR. At the latest follow-up, there was no evidence of an increased risk for intussusception with rotavirus vaccine (moderate SoE) nor of diabetes (high SoE). For newer vaccines such as 9-valent human papillomavirus and meningococcal B vaccines, there was no evidence of an increased risk or there was insufficient evidence for key adverse events. For adults, for the new adjuvanted inactivated influenza vaccine and recombinant adjuvanted zoster vaccine, there was no evidence of an increased risk (varied SoE) or there was insufficient evidence for key adverse events. Among pregnant women, there was no evidence of an increased risk for key adverse events, including stillbirth, following tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (moderate SoE).


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“This research is an important reminder that vaccines are safe and any risk they may pose is far outweighed by their ability to protect against diseases,” Gidengil said in a statement.

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