Is Knee Osteoarthritis More Prevalent in Female Minorities?

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Recently revealed research outlines how knee osteoarthritis is more prevalent in female minorities.

Presented at the American College of Rheumatology, the study shows that African-American women are more likely to suffer from knee osteoarthritis. Researchers also found that African-American women are more susceptible to having the need for joint replacement surgery. Hispanic women are also found to be more at risk than Caucasian women or men in general.

“Today, sufferers resort to various medications and natural remedies just to reduce their pain and improve their overall condition,” said VitaBreeze Supplements spokesperson Michelle O’Sullivan in a statement.

Researchers found that African-American women were 17% more at risk. Caucasian women were 10% more susceptible to the condition.

What places Hispanic and African-American women at high risk of developing knee osteoarthritis? Researchers point to obesity, which is a major risk factor of the condition. In order to reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis, clinicians suggest people maintain a proper diet and lifestyle.

In addition, researchers found that it is not only Hispanic and African-American women who are ate risk of knee osteoarthritis, but any individual who is considered to be overweight or obese.Again, physicians suggest fun activities and delicious food and beverage items to promote weight loss.


Recently revealed research outlines how knee osteoarthritis is more prevalent in female minorities.
Recently revealed research outlines how knee osteoarthritis is more prevalent in female minorities.
Millions of people from around the world are suffering from knee osteoarthritis. This condition is debilitating, and can significantly reduce the quality of life of the sufferers. While age, occurrence of injury, and genes are considered to be the common risk factors of the condition, there is a certain group of people who are also believed to be more susceptible to the condition.
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