Lasmiditan Reduces Migraine Symptoms

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A study evaluating the safety and efficacy of long-term exposure to lasmiditan over 12 months is ongoing.
A study evaluating the safety and efficacy of long-term exposure to lasmiditan over 12 months is ongoing.
The following article features coverage from PAINWeek 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Click here to read more of Clinical Pain Advisor's conference coverage.

LAS VEGAS – Lasmiditan may be be effective in the acute treatment of headache pain and most bothersome related symptoms in patients experiencing migraine attacks, according to the results of a study presented at PAINWeek 2017, held September 5-9.1

Researchers randomly assigned participants with moderate to severe disability (mean Migraine Disability Assessment Score 31.3; 82% with >1 cardiovascular risk factor) to receive lasmiditan 200 mg (n=518), lasmiditan 100 mg (n=503), or placebo treatment (n=524) within 4 hours of migraine onset. For rescue or recurrence, patients could take a second dose between 2 and 24 hours after the initial dose.

Patients who received lasmiditan 200 mg (32.2%) and 100 mg (28.2%) were headache pain-free 2 hours after the first dose compared with placebo (15.3%; P <.001 for both). In a similar fashion, more patients were free of the most bothersome symptom 2 hours after the first dose of lasmiditan (200 mg, 40.7%; 100 mg, 40.9%) compared with placebo (29.5%; P <.001).

Compared with placebo, significantly more participants in the combined lasmiditan groups experienced headache relief (42.2% vs 59%, P <.001). More patients in the placebo group (58%) took a second dose for rescue than in the lasmiditan 200 mg (29%) and 100 mg (36%) groups.

Treatment-emergent adverse events were more common in patients in the lasmiditan 200 mg (42.7%) and 100 mg (36.3%) groups compared with the placebo group (16.4%). Following the initial dose, the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (>2% compared with placebo) were dizziness, fatigue, lethargy, nausea, paresthesia, and somnolence. No serious adverse events or discontinuations due to adverse events were noted.

Kraig Kinchen, MD, senior medical director for lasmiditan, called the results of the study "very encouraging," as they are "consistent with a previous phase 3 study that showed the safety and efficacy of lasmiditan in patients with migraines." A study evaluating the safety and efficacy of long-term exposure to lasmiditan over 12 months is ongoing.

Read more of Clinical Pain Advisor's coverage of PAINWeek 2017 by visiting the conference page.

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Reference

  1. Kuca B, Wietecha L, Berg P, Aurora S, Dennehy E. Lasmiditan (200 mg and 100 mg) compared to 1465 placebo for acute treatment of migraine. Presented at: PAINWeek 2017; September 5-9; Las Vegas, Nevada.
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