Genetics May Play A Role With Aspirin, NSAIDs, and Cancer Risk

Share this content:
Genetics Could Play Role With Aspirin, NSAIDs, and CRC Risk
Genetics Could Play Role With Aspirin, NSAIDs, and CRC Risk

Researchers from Indiana University have identified genetic markers to help determine which patients may benefit from regular aspirin and other NSAIDs for reducing the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

This was the first genome-wide analysis of gene by environment interactions between SNPs and regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs as related to colorectal cancer risk. 

For the case-control study, study authors used the Colon Cancer Family Registry and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium to include 8,634 colorectal cancer cases and 8,553 non-cancer controls obtained between 1976–2011.

The team found that the risk of colorectal cancer varied based on genetic variation at two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosomes 12 and 15.

Aspirin and/or NSAID use was linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer vs. non-regular use (28% vs. 28%; odds ratio [OR] 0.69, 95% CI: 0.64–0.74). Aspirin and/or NSAID use was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among those with rs2965667-TT genotype (28% vs 38%; OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.61–0.70) but with a higher risk among those with rare TA or AA genotypes (35% vs 29%; OR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.27–2.81]; P=0.002). 

Regular use of aspirin and/or NSAID was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs16973225-AA genotype but was not associated with risk of colorectal cancer among those with less common AC or CC genotypes.

The study findings may help the future development of targeted colorectal prevention strategies.

Reference

1. Nan H. JAMA. 2015; 313(11):1133-1142.

 

You must be a registered member of Clinical Pain Advisor to post a comment.